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The video clips and the lessons that accompany them aim to help students better understand the universality of the immigrant experience. By listening to the Yemeni American youths, the viewer is able to see how similar his or her life has been in comparison to other young people who immigrated to the U.S. or to those who have parents who are immigrants. Students will learn about the history and culture of people from the Republic of Yemen and about their lives and times in the United States. This includes an appreciation of their religion and family values. 

For additional teaching resources and classroom ideas consult From the Queen of Sheba to the Republic of Yemen authored by Marta Colburn with illustrations by Maha al-Hibshi and Bruce Paluck. Published by The American Institute for Yemeni Studies.

The clips along with the complementary materials also teach students how to create oral history projects. In turn, these develop and instill many important skills such as:
- Writing clearly stated questions that can elicit the responses the interviewer is seeking.
- Speaking clearly and precisely so the person being interviewed understands what is being asked.
- Listening attentively enables students to formulate follow-up questions.
- Editing the answers allows the most important points to emerge.

The videos and accompanying lessons can be used with an entire classroom or assigned to students to watch at home and bring answers to the questions for discussion in class.

Each set of lessons has three parts.

Reflective discussion questions: These help students think back on what they learned from the video clips and what their reactions are to what they have seen. This can serve as the basis for classroom discussion.

Comparative questions and activities: These encourage students to think about the ways in which the Yemeni American youths are at once different and similar to themselves.

Methodology: These questions are aimed at getting students to analyze how the interviewer was able to get the kinds of responses seen in the clips. This helps students create their own oral history projects.

Objectives

1. Students will be able to locate and label the Republic of Yemen on an outline map. 
2. Students will be able to explain the reasons Yemenis came to the United States in the 1960s to work in the agricultural sector.
3. Students will be able to compare the Yemeni immigrant experience to that of other immigrant groups.
4. Students will be able to compare their daily lives to the experiences articulated by the Yemeni American youths in the video clips.
5. Students will be able to describe the basic tenets of Islam.
6. Students will be able to complete several or all lessons included in the module.
7. Students will be able to identify the main steps in creating an oral history project.
8. Students will be able to complete an oral history project.

Standards

National Council of Teachers of English Standards

4. Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.

9. Students develop an understanding of and respect for diversity in language use, patterns, and dialects across cultures, ethnic groups, geographic regions, and social roles.

12. Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).

California Language Arts Standards

Ninth and Tenth Grades

2.0 Speaking Applications (Genres and Their Characteristics). Students deliver polished formal and extemporaneous presentations that combine the traditional rhetorical strategies of narration, exposition, persuasion, and description.

Speaking Standard 1.0.

2.3 Apply appropriate interviewing techniques: a. Prepare and ask relevant questions. b. Make notes of responses. c. Use language that conveys maturity, sensitivity, and respect. d. Respond correctly and effectively to questions. e. Demonstrate knowledge of the subject or organization. f. Compile and report responses. g. Evaluate the effectiveness of the interview.

2.3 Write reflective compositions: a. Explore the significance of personal experiences, events, conditions, or concerns by using rhetorical strategies (e.g., narration, description, exposition, persuasion). b. Draw comparisons between specific incidents and broader themes that illustrate the writer’s important beliefs or generalizations about life. c. Maintain a balance in describing individual incidents and relate those incidents to more general and abstract ideas.

Eleventh and Twelfth Grades 

1.0 Writing Strategies. Students write coherent and focused texts that convey a well-defined perspective and tightly reasoned argument. The writing demonstrates students’ awareness of the audience and purpose and progression through the stages of the writing process.

1.0 Listening and Speaking Strategies. Students formulate adroit judgments about oral communication. They deliver focused and coherent presentations that convey clear and distinct perspectives and demonstrate solid reasoning. They use gestures, tone, and vocabulary tailored to the audience and purpose.

2.0 Speaking Applications (Genres and Their Characteristics). Students deliver polished formal and extemporaneous presentations that combine traditional rhetorical strategies of narration, exposition, persuasion, and description. Student speaking demonstrates a command of standard American English and the organizational and delivery strategies outlined in Listening and Speaking Standard 1.0.

2.1 Deliver reflective presentations: a. Explore the significance of personal experiences, events, conditions, or concerns, using appropriate rhetorical strategies (e.g., narration, description, exposition, persuasion). b. Draw comparisons between the specific incident and broader themes that illustrate the speaker’s beliefs or generalizations about life. c. Maintain a balance between describing the incident and relating it to more general, abstract ideas.

Standards from the National Center for History Education in the Schools

The student understands major global trends since World War II.

Grades 5-12

Compare causes, consequences, and major patterns of international migrations in the late 20th century with world population movements of the 19th century and the first half of the 20th century.

California History/Social Science Standards

Tenth Grade

10.10 Students analyze instances of nation-building in the contemporary world in at least two of the following regions or countries: the Middle East, Africa, Mexico and other parts of Latin America, and China.

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